The Pixilated Podcast

Ep. 104 | Interview | Patrick Shek | The Legacy Experience

October 28, 2020 Patrick Rife | Patrick Shek Season 1 Episode 104
The Pixilated Podcast
Ep. 104 | Interview | Patrick Shek | The Legacy Experience
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to another episode of the Pixilated Podcast. I’m Patrick Rife and today we’re going to talk with Patrick Shek, Partner at Legacy.

Website: www.legacyexhibits.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legacyexhibits/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/legacyexhibits/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/legacy-exhibits-llc/

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Patrick Rife:

Hello and welcome to another episode of The Pixilated Podcast. I'm Patrick Rife. And today we're going to be speaking with Patrick, check partner at legacy. Patrick. Hey, man, how's it going? Welcome to The Pixilated Podcast.

Patrick Shek:

Appreciate your invite me, and I'm glad to be here.

Patrick Rife:

Yeah, I had so much fun on our call last week. And one of the best things about doing these podcasts is part of it is us reaching out and trying to connect with new people and do the whole thing. But then you've got all of these tried and true relationships that you had for years. And as I like, catch up with people, I'm like, ah, like, we got to have you on because this is always a it's always a good conversation, we get to connect with one another. And, obviously, you know, another Baltimore and events company that is dealing with your COVID dance. So it'll be it'll be fun to have a chat with you about it. So Patrick, the way that we usually kick these interview episodes off is, um, why don't you go ahead and you know, take 3060 seconds, give everybody the primer on who you are, and what legacy is, and then we'll get into some some chat after that. Okay, cool. Great. Thanks. Again, thanks for thanks for inviting us and glad to be here. So I'm a Patrick check, as you said, I partner with with a company based out of Columbia called legacy traditionally, we are legacy exhibits, where we design build and manage the physical tradeshow exhibit for small, medium large size brands.

Patrick Shek:

To your point about with with COVID, you know, in live events, being, you know, being put on hold for the momentum, we've also recently launched legacy Creative Services. And that is, really to help our current customers. And any new new potential with, you know, just simple things like logo design, graphic design, 3d design, we can we have a capability to print marketing material now. So brochures, marketing, marketing, handouts, business cards, and such. We also have legacy promo items, which is, again, just to, you know, koozies, stress balls, pens, all that good stuff. But then more importantly, we've also launched legacy virtual experiences, which is taking everything that we've had over our history of being legacy exhibits, and turning it into virtual and creating, you know, meaningful experiences for our customers to connect with their, you know, what their, what their target audience and client base, that are really meaningful manner that trying to replicate what we've done during the in person live event, virtually.

Patrick Rife:

Awesome, man. Great, great, great recap. So there are a lot of places I want to go in, in our interview, and I'm going to mostly stick away from any, like, scripty kind of pre written questions. Because I think that one thing that's really unique about you and your point of view that you bring to the conversation, as well as your experience with legacy that we haven't really had on the podcast yet, is a big scale producer, inside of the event space, like so from like an infrastructure point of view, you're going to be easily the most informed person that we've had a chance to talk to yet, and also a person that does work and all of the big ones that are that are out there. So I think that there's a lot that can come out of that. But before we get into those questions, I would also love to, like, hit on the other side of of it, which hopefully you don't you don't mind peeling back the curtain a little bit, but let's just talk for a second about you know, like, before we started the call, I was like, how do you want me to like title the company, you know, like, is it? You know, is it just legacy? Is it legacy exhibition services, like, you know, like, and you, we talked a little bit about pivoting and additional product decisions and how you how you banner and get your messaging out there and you know, like, what is the top brand? And what are the brands that kind of nest underneath of it. So, but before that before that problem happens before you have these additional brands that you need to figure out, you need to come up with them. And those clearly some of them came out of a huge shift that happened in quarter two of this year and needing to do that. And we did a lot of that as well. What I would love to hear first is what did you what was the process like over their legacy? You know, like, when you guys were like what? Holy moly, like there goes all of our revenue, what are we going to sell? Like, take me there take me to that day, I'm guessing, you know, like, it's similar to what it was was three of us, there was only three of us. And we got in a room with a whiteboard. And we just started writing down like, you know, like our assets and figuring out like how we did them, but I'd love to hear how you guys approached it.

Patrick Shek:

So it was like, pretty clear to us. Back in March. It was March. When events started canceling, and clients started calling to, you know, calling us in a panic, because they're, in some cases, their property was actually on the loading dock or in transit, or at the convention center. And they're like, What in the world do we do? Right? So it was pretty clear to us that this was going to be a problem. We honestly thought that this was maybe wishful thinking and airport art that, you know, once we got to this point now in the fall, October November shows would, what would would be happening, we started then, the end of the summer, seeing, hey, events are going going virtual, they're canceling they're postponing next year. And so we started to have to, like, take a hard look at realize that, you know, maybe this is going to trickle into 2021 took for a good portion of that year, as well. And so what do we do? Right? So we realized that back in the summer, retail spaces, and office buildings, they're gonna want to bring their work staff for their clients, or the customers back into the building at some point. And by that time, we realized that the, you know, the health protocol was pretty important. So, you know, honestly, how we got through the summer was we we, you know, got some contracts with, you know, building out these, you know, we call them, you know, hygiene barriers, the acrylic things that you see, you know, the sneeze guards or whatever you want to call them at the registration desk, the reception desk, the checkout counter. Yeah, pretty much. So you know, so honestly, that kind of like was a big part of our, of our saving grace in the beginning part of this. And, you know, why we spend shifted to, you know, Creative Services, promo items, virtual, we had no choice. I mean, because we, you know, our business model is, we designed the thing, we build the thing, we manage the thing, well, I've got a warehouse full of crates that haven't moved in six months, and they're not going to move probably for, you know, hopefully soon, but another six months, realistically. And so it allowed us to, you know, take a hard look at what we do, right? And at the end of the day, you ask a question, like, you know, who is legacy? What legacy is the forerunners? It's myself, it's Mark ledson, Sean Parsons is Brad Slater, we are the company, we are the brand, right. And, you know, we don't have, you know, a huge team that it's kind of similar to like, you guys, right. And so it's, you know, we said, well, we can really kind of do anything, because not anything, but you know, to a certain extent anything, because we are the company, right? We are the brand. So we said managing, you know, the needs for a physical, you know, tradeshow exhibit, it's kind of the same as somebody who needs, you know, brochures, or business cards or promotional items, or, you know, companies or office buildings leaving like a hygiene barriers and Dunkin Donuts, hygiene barriers, right, it's all about the customer service. And at the end of the day, that's what we always said that that's 100% control with the customer service. And so we said, You know what, we're gonna make it to the other side of this where Unfortunately, there's a lot of our competitors a lot, but there's going to be a good good percentage of our competitors that aren't going to make it to the other side of this, because they just can't go that long without, you know, consistent revenue stream, and there's help from, you know, lates, you know, state, local, federal government, but at the end of the day, I just don't know, if it's going to be enough. We kind of just dug in a little bit, and said, you know, things that we didn't normally provide, and kind of just pass them off? Well, we've developed a a, you know, a business model that says, No, we can't control it, we can be you know, we can get a little bit of profit out of it. And it just if it's a value add to our customers, then why not? Right? Yep. And then good. Well, no, no, please. Well, kind of like ties into what you and I've talked about prior is, you know, with this whole virtual experience model, we know that customers are customers, when we get back to live events in person, they're going to need these things still. So why not, you know, use this time that we have to create a, you know, a good sound business model for those products and services. Because, again, it's just going to be a value add when we get back to get back to live events.

Patrick Rife:

So in terms of, right, okay, so there's identify, identifying, right, what your, what your additional offerings can be. Talk to me a little bit about. So like, one of the things that I think is challenging right now, and it's always challenging because you have to think about your messaging, right? You have to make sure that you don't lose your your clients on the way to wherever you're going. So a lot of that has to do with you know, product design. in marketing, but as it hits the sales channel, so tell me a little bit about about, you know, how you guys approached getting the word out about these additional things? Did they come on like first this one, then this one, then this one. So that way you had like, okay, like this month we're gonna reach out to everyone through direct email or is it just, you know, newsletters? Or is it all just like, well, just in our one to one conversations, we're going to have this stuff like, how did you approach bringing in whatever, I guess, old business to new products and new offerings,

Patrick Shek:

right. So we've always been from, like a branding standpoint, it's always been like, our logo is big legacy. And then exhibits is kind of tiny underneath, you know, justify to the right, right. And then, but everybody kind of knew us is legacy, right? The Legacy boys, whatever. So, you know, we kind of said that we can take that exhibits part out and kind of fill it in with promo items with Creative Services with virtual experiences with really, whatever that our customers we think our customers need. So that's always been, you know, for the first couple years of our existence, existence, that's, you know, a big priority of us was to have them know us as just legacy, right? So that's kind of like, how we got to the point where we're a hierarchy thing, or tearing who we are from a branding standpoint. So we kind of were like, good with that a little bit. Right. And then, you know, we just, you know, through email campaigns through just picking up the phone and cold calling, it's not really cold calling, because it's our customers, right? Sure. You know, and, and we've had the benefit of, you know, up until COVID, hip, the relationship sale was always our first sale. Mm hmm. And our customers, there's no weird tension, or it doesn't feel off when we just pick up the phone and call to see how they are. Sure. And because of that, we're able to pick up the phone and see how they are and then talk to them about, hey, we now offer this and this and this, you know, targeted email campaigns. We're big on our social media, as a way of just not necessarily like, you know, pitching a product or a new product or new services, but it's more like educational just to see how people are and just, you know, just to show that we care. Empathy is a big a big deal with us. And so with all that, understood, it's just not a very hard icebreaker when you pick up the phone, and yeah, you ask your client, like, Hey, we may think you could benefit from this product or this service. We offer that now. And we'll see where it goes. You know?

Patrick Rife:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Thanks. Yeah. Good, good answer for sure. So, I'm curious about you've spoken a little bit about clients who had stuff on the loading dock, things that were, you know, like the the cogs returning on big events, big productions. I mean, you know, we saw, we saw things like, whatever South by Southwest got canceled, right? Probably, like the largest tech conference from like, a public perception point of view, you know, like we saw Coachella and Bonnaroo and like all of this, all these big pop culture kind of events. But those are by far, like not the biggest dogs in the world, they just happen to be the most, the most brand unique. But let's talk for a second, you know, let's talk about the CES CES. Let's let's talk about, you know, an even CES has a lot of brand equity to it. Right? Let's talk about the, the the CES for, you know, like HR representatives, or, you know, like all of these just absolutely enormous trade show events that are taking place that have been kind of gutted. So, so clearly, we are far from seeing what the what the total impact is going to be, you know, like that's going to reverberate for a very long time. But I'm just curious from, from your professional point of view, really working in that space, you know, like, what do you see as the biggest challenges to recapture what that momentum was because like we've hit a stop gap now, right? So like, things will have to happen for CES to come back online and look and feel as, as as impactful as it did, and certainly like it's going to change like things won't be eligible to come back on the table. new things will need to be realized and designed and invented to come up. to supplant what that what that transition was, but, you know, I would love to just hear, you know, how you guys are thinking about it like what what you think is going to be the big currents that are going to reshape how that how that ecosystem changes and comes back?

Patrick Shek:

It's kind of crazy to think about it because this, you know, a traditional trade show, the business model has been the same business model for 60 years. 70 years, right? You, you have a big building, Convention Center. Brand buys and invests in some structure, you send it in, you build it, you have 2345, sometimes five day event, you take it down, and it's done. Right, and you try to gain as much attention, fill as much pipeline, make as many contacts as you can in that 2345 Day event. Do I think it's going to get back to that point? And maybe not to that capacity anytime soon. So you asked about CES, right? CES is Jim electronics show, it's always in Vegas, it's always the first week in January. And I think last year, it was in total, may takes over all of Vegas. So the convention center, the sands, most of the big hotels that have meeting spaces, outside of the convention center, they have all the parking lots filled. I think it's about 20 to 30,000 exhibiting companies, and then about 180 to 200,000 visitors, attendees. Well, they they back in September decided that we're going to take everything and shifted virtual. So it can be really interesting to see how that virtual platform works for for a an industry like CES. I mean, there's some booze there that, you know, Samsung, LG, they probably invest in 678 million dollars in a three day or four day event, right, so that it's not insignificant.

Patrick Rife:

Sure.

Patrick Shek:

And so, you know, we start thinking about well 2020, one's virtual? What about 2022? Okay, at that point, what are we? What's the landscape of, you know, whether it's the facility, the Association, the government, the state government, the local government, the federal government, take into factor international travel, both from an attendee, but also an exhibiting standpoint, where are we going to be so I honestly believe it's going to be some sort of hybrid model, where there's going to be virtual components to pretty much all major industry shows, whether it's something the size of CES or something small, where, you know, it's, it's it's health information management show where maybe there's, you know, 3000 exhibitors, and there's 30,000 attendees, there's going to be some virtual component, because there's going to be a limitation on how many people can be in the building at one time. I think that from the exhibitor standpoint, they're going to be real conscientious about the investment that they make, instead of going to a 30 by 30, exhibit, maybe they go down to a 20 by 20. And instead of a 20. By 20, they go from an island booth space to an inline booth space, instead of sending, you know, 30 of their team members, maybe they send 15 the same thing from the visitors the attendee standpoint, instead of sending a team of 12, maybe they send the four or five top executives that actually are, you know, have the buying power and decision making capabilities instead of, you know, experiencing the three days, maybe they're there for a day or day and a half, very targeted a lot of their time. Yep. So then they supplement that with the virtual piece, right? Whether it's continuing education, or it's, you know, you can pick and choose which breakout sessions or speakers, you know, small speakers that are, you know, have 3045 minute time slots where now your team, if I'm the Executive, my team is, you know, back at, you know, the office or at their home, still experiencing it, but it's through a virtual tour one. That's what I honestly think is going to be the next step. Because there's just no way that they're ever going to allow, you know, 30,000 people to walk in, you know, over a three day period into the convention center. Sure, there's going to be temperature checks, there's going to be, you know, kind of like we see in the grocery stores, you're up, you know, you're walking one way in this aisle and one way in the other aisle. Yeah, we're at like, CES over at the convention center last year. I mean, you could barely walk through some of the the areas of the aisles because all the booths, you know, the exhibitors their space, it was like overflowing, right? Sure. Yeah. So it's, it's going to be interesting to see. Yeah, they're going to be those I don't know if you ever seen like a video of like a mechanical like Tomato sorter, where like, they're all coming over a conveyor belt and it's got this these got like these these lenses that are using like AI to see like a green tomato, and it just like, you know, there's like thousands of them rolling by and just like striking out, but so we're gonna have that someone's gonna, like, come down and like, claw grab you and like, pick you up and put you in quarantine or something like that. But the cool, the cool thing is, it can be done. Right? And, yeah, you know, we're seeing it coming out of Asia, we're seeing it coming out of some places, and you're still having these larger events. And, you know, it can be done. It's got masks on, everybody's getting temperature checks, everybody's going through the proper protocol. And, you know, the thing that kind of my side of it, right, and the other way that the service side of these events, right, the people that actually contract with the brands, the sponsors who are paying for essentially everything to build this event. I mean, it's we're talking about protocol, right? And that's all Yeah, yeah, for you, we have to shift, we have to, you know, we have a well laid plan, and then all of a sudden, something happens, and you got to shift, right in real time. That's what we're shooting for. So we got covered,

Patrick Rife:

you guys are perfect for it. Yeah, you gotta be there on the frontlines. There's a,

Patrick Shek:

there's a lot of there's a lot of chatter, you know, specifically, like through LinkedIn, and, and, and, you know, again, from our service side of things, where people like, just give us the opportunity to, to make a change, right, to help put these protocols into place. And I think we release, we're trending in the upward direction. So that's good.

Patrick Rife:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think that I think that, that that totally makes sense. You know, one of the conversations that I've had happened, and I'd be curious to hear what you think, but I had a conversation with a colleague, and we talked about the nature of live events, particularly from a sales and marketing capacity. Not, you know, not your Coachella necessarily, unless you're the sponsor. But we talked a lot about the exhibit hall moving to a different place in the funnel, particularly as we start to incorporate, virtual and as we start to extend and add to virtual touch points, right, like, ideally, we're going to start to get a better idea of the lifecycle of a client, right? Like, we're gonna have a better idea where we're engaging with them both on and offline, as long as we're like plugging, plugging the appropriate tools in there. But all of that being said, like, knowing that it's going to be a, a more managed environment that you're going to be going into, and knowing that people are probably going to pare down their resources and scale up their intentionality with why they're there, who they're choosing to send there, you know, like what that person's mission is why they're there. I'm curious if you had any conversations along those lines, like Does, does, you know, does the exhibit hall moved to middle funnel instead of being top funnel? And if it does do that, are there are there tools? Are there behaviors does the does the run of show change, to reflect that goal versus you know, like, you know, Kohler may not need to put to put in like a 90 foot wide by 100 foot high wall with like 70 faucets like on it that are all like running in real time. And it's like, that spectacle, you know, so I'm curious to hear what your thoughts are on that.

Patrick Shek:

Well, it's interesting, you said like Cola, right? And not to pick on color, but because it's it's like this with every industry, like the top players in an industry. A lot of their decisions on what to build and how much to invest in is based off a little bit of fear. And that means like, Oh, well, the guy next door who's selling a comparable product, he's got his full product line, so I got to bring my full product line. So I think that maybe this you know, this these events that were not happening and that we're not having are going to take, you know, force people to take a real hard look of what are we investing? And do we need to build the biggest circus? Yeah, right. And take a look at, okay, we take this thing called a trade show, right? And historically, it was two to four days. And the largest percentage of my target audience is walking through the front door of this convention, Hall, hotel, whatever. And if I build the biggest circus with Most lights, cameras and the action, their natural inclination is going to come to us. Mm hmm. Sure, there is a conversation to be had there. But your point was on the biggest sponsor, they're not coming to me, right, if I'm not the biggest circus, front and center of the convention hall when they walk in, and they can't not run into me, right. If you're back in the right corner, back in the left corner behind that, you may get some residuals. But if you don't start treating these trade shows, as a point on the sales and marketing journey, right, if you don't engage with the same target audience, in our opinion, three to six months before this event is going to happen. And just rely on them being there and you being there, they're going to show up, and we're going to help create this great rapport, I'm going to get all the contact information, I'm going to be able to put them down into the, you know, through our through our sales funnel, I'm going to follow up with them and in you know, in a week or two, and then voila, we got close sales, and it's not going to happen. So, you know, one of the things that we've even prior to COVID is okay, let's create this roadmap for the specific company selling a specific set of products and services, using the 32 to three to four day trade show as a big marker on that roadmap. Well, if we don't kind of like, throw in a party, right? We have 2000 other people throwing the exact same party in the exact same building, all vying for the same attention of the same party visitors. And we don't need at least send out an invitation, what are they going to know our party is going to be better than their party, and what you know, the experience that they have with us is going to be more memorable, it's going to, it's going to answer more questions, it's going to provide more of the solutions to their problems, then the guy next door right when the girl next door. So you know, that's one thing, I think that it's going to be a huge benefit of us having to experience what we experienced, ie the lights going off of these live events. shifting to virtual component is using that virtual component to grab as much pre event attention. So once we get them at the event, whether it's virtual, a hybrid of virtual or full, fully live and in person, you've qualified people, they've qualified you. There's reason and purpose for them coming to your space, you can preset appointments, huge advocate of that, right? preset appointments, don't just say, hey, just stop by the booth, or stop by the exhibit, I'll be the guy in the red shirt. Just come up and say hi. Right? The chances of doing it are pretty slim. Yeah, sure. So if we can use a virtual experience to capture as much data, not just contact information data that we can now qualify. And they also can qualify us, as in they have a problem, we have a real viable solution for that problem. Maybe instead of, you know, the trade show floor, or the virtual trade show floor as the starting point of that journey. Maybe it's when you close the sale, maybe it's when you close the deal. Who knows right? Maybe it's when you What's the last thing that that prospective buyer needed for them to say yeah, I'm gonna, I'm gonna buy I'm gonna move forward. Yeah, you know.

Patrick Rife:

Yeah, I don't disagree with you. I don't disagree with you. I think that um, I think that, like, certain like, competition is, is a healthy nurture for bringing things back as well, right? Mm hmm. competitive spirit, if you will.

Patrick Shek:

100% 100% I mean, there was that, you know, what I gathered just from my observe observation of being as many tradeshow floors as I have, there's a lot of complacency. Right. There's a lot of there's a lot of from the exhibitor side, you know, their team who were there representing that company, you are not that much enthusiasm for being there. There's really not that much outward engagement. And it's like, okay, we built this thing. It's got our logo on it, all of our if it's an actual tangible product, it's there sitting on a shelf. Why am I not getting any close sales? You know what I mean? So it's totally Yeah, what's Yeah, I mean, spending 10s hundreds, thousands millions of dollars. If, you know, again, at CES, you walk into Samsung, they build a massive it's almost like a trade show inside of a trade show. Right? Don't build their own purpose, you know, their own branded tradeshow inside the trade show and once you know it's big, it's it's it's live it's action and draws people there. And plus, you got the name Samsung, right? Yeah, sure. So it's, it's It's easy for people to go, I'm gonna go to the Samsung booth. If you're not the Samsung's, right? How are you going to get them? those same people that are spending 20 3040 minutes, coming back the next day coming back to the third day to the Samsung booth because they didn't quite see everything? How are you going to get that attention away from them over to you? Because you know that you can provide a better product or a better service? Yeah, sure, we need them to come to your space, because otherwise you just spent, you know, $150,000 for nothing,

Patrick Rife:

just flat flush it. Yeah, I think one of the things that we you know, that we've returned to, you know, time and again, particularly with the products that we build was, you know, as as the the suite of Pixilated products, right, whether it's our kiosks going in there, it's PixiWeb, whatever the case may be, you know, our argument was always you need to create experiences, you need to capture data around those experiences. But also, like, you need to make sure that those experiences are, are integrated appropriately. And that they're, they're high functioning, because, you know, at the end of the day, you have to look at the be all end all success for your your tradeshow exhibit or pop up or whatever you're doing is going to be the people that are staffing it for you, they're going to be the ambassadors that are there representing your company. And for so long, like, kind of the toss up was like, Okay, do I like, do I bring the person with with a huge personality, but they suck at entering like the CRM data at the end of the day, and it never gets in there. And there's never right, because they're like, going at it all day. And then like five o'clock hits, and they're like, let's get a drink. And then it's like, let's get six drinks, and then they're groggy waking up the next morning. And that's all they can do to get themselves amped up and back down onto the sales floor. And that gets pushed to the back, or, you know, like, I'm gonna have my guy or gal that is awesome. And it's so meticulous about entering all the data, but their personality is like a brown wall. And they're not going to get any data to be able to enter afterwards. And what we kind of, you know, what our predicate was, we're going to make awesome experiences that are easy things for your people to just say, hey, come do this thing. And then that thing is going to capture data. And we're going to automate it and place it wherever you need it. So all the bean counters can watch what's happening from a distance. And so when your team gets back from wherever they've gone to, all they got to do is open up their CRM, and they've got a list of pre qualified leads that they met, and they understand and there's a picture and they say, like, oh, that guy, we talked about this, he's Alliance band, etc, etc. So that way, you can choose to invest all of your, your money, from a staffing point of view, and people that have incredible, go get them attitudes, and make sure that you give them the right tools. So that way, when they kick ass all day long and five o'clock hits, they can go have drinks, and they don't have to be worried about doing like the data entry side of it. So

Patrick Shek:

Well, it's interesting. You said, because you know, this, this last point, because I'll do this forever, right? Is what is this historical, typical way of use air quotes lead collection? And an in person event, right? Yeah. I'm gonna scan your badge. And what does that do? Right. You know, I mean, so it's like, okay, a is and what we've seen, because nobody really wants to get inundated with these very templated, boring follow up messages. And that's the last thing they get right, is that they won't actually put their email address, they'll put sales at marketing app info at right. So we got that problem. They don't fill in all the information, because it's not required. So maybe you have really no, you're missing blanks in your CRM, that scanning of the badge, maybe you're not, it's not automatically, or you can't with relative ease, fill that into your your CRM pipeline. So again, there's show ends on Wednesday, we're talking maybe a week or two until there's actual the data collected in one spot for somebody to actually do something with it, right? Sure. Plus, you have to think in factor in the human dynamic, which this is you guys are key on this right? is a lot of people I've seen actually take their badge and they flip it. Right. So you're seeing the backside of the badge, because they don't want you to scan their badge because they don't want you to scan their badge, right, kind of like when you're in a in a department store or whatever. They're like, Oh, do you need help? I'm good.

Patrick Rife:

You know, what are you looking for? And you're like no

Patrick Shek:

turning by bad. So if there's a way to collect a higher and much more meaningful set of data, yep. That actually gives that that that representative from that company during their follow up to give it you know, it's much more targeted, total As much more detailed if you can collect that in a, you know, a much more relaxed way, where there's actually some, like enjoyment with it. Yeah, not feel like, Hey, I'm chasing you around the booth space with this dinner trying to scan your badge, you know,

Patrick Rife:

I mean, for first party, you know, I think that probably the most valuable thing that we bring to the table is is providing companies easy ways to capture first party data and integrate it into their system and the two value points there are, it happens through experience, which just creates camaraderie, which is critical to getting people to follow up with you afterwards. And, and number two, like it is first party data. So the you know, like the scanning of the badges, like I don't even when we go to a when we set up at a trade show, like I don't do that at all, like I never even download the app because I for two reasons. One, because I just I have no faith in it, but for to like then all of a sudden, you're presenting their stats for how their funnel how they perceive their funnel to work, but you know, like, they're not going to look in and say like, by the way, like 83% of our of our contact email addresses are actually info at emails, right, they're just gonna say, we've got 70,000 emails in our database, despite the fact that you know, like, 30% are bad emails that have been in there for 10 years, because you guys don't do database up that you like, you don't flush, you don't do it. Like, there's so much stuff that goes into it. And like, the easiest way to end up totally upside down is using someone else's metrics and KPIs to like, your, like, impact in your ROI. And like, they just, they're not apples, there's no way that they can be apples to apples noon, and two, I understand how we got here. But I also think it's time to like, be loud and say like, that shit doesn't work. Like you need to go in. And you need to architect, you know, like, you should be watertight, like, yes, you exist inside of a bigger broader trade show. But like much in the case of Samsung, right, you know, like Samsung's not leaving it up to CES to give them the data for people that showed up in their Samsung has dope data capture systems in place that complement one another. And they all feed into their database. And they're looking at it in real time, probably like, hour by hour. And really no, like they're tweaking their smart and you got to bring your A game if you really want to win there, for sure. Yep. Patrick, you're right, we will keep talking forever. So let's, we will save it right. Like we probably have a follow up episode in the wings, you know, if I would if I would guess yeah. So, before we go, though, why don't you let everyone know, like, tell them where to where to get in touch with you where they should maybe follow along with legacy, you know, whatever you want to share.

Patrick Shek:

So legacy exhibits comm we just launched legacy Creative Services calm. And then legacy promo items calm are our three main websites. We're actually right now, you know, discussing how do we merge them all? And what does that look like? So it's just one central area. Easiest way for people to contact me is through LinkedIn. And more than all the time. Just search Patrick check. Legacy exhibits partner, easiest way to do it. We're also you know, through the through legacy exhibits on Instagram or on Facebook, all that good stuff. But you know, LinkedIn is probably our go to not necessarily the legacy exhibits LinkedIn page, but mine personally, we do that on purpose, because I want people to see me first and foremost, because, you know, that's your, they're gonna be talking to you when they when they ever you know, want to partner with us or, or, you know, benefit from a product or service that we can provide them.

Patrick Rife:

Amazing, Patrick, you know, thank you so much for taking the time out of your day to talk with us. You know, wishing you guys all of the luck. And kanak kanak. Can't wait to see all this get back and on the horse again. Yeah,

Patrick Shek:

now well, you know, you guys are great. And the things you're doing are unbelievable. You guys are definitely turning into a staple in the Baltimore area. So kudos to you guys as well and tell the whole team I said hello. And you know, I can't wait to for us to keep harping on things. And when we get back to whatever it is that we get back to you. We're gonna we're definitely going to, you know, bring a lot of value to our customers. So appreciate your time and invite me on here.

Patrick Rife:

Yeah, definitely. Alright guys. So that's it for another interview episode of The Pixilated Podcast, I'd encourage you to go connect with Patrick over on LinkedIn follow some legacy social accounts so you can see some of their product offerings what they're up to. If you don't mind before you go if you could please remember to rate review or subscribe, you know, one, two, or three, whatever you're more comfortable with. Your reviews help us find more listeners that might be interested in checking our show out. And when you subscribe, you are guaranteeing that you get notified each day when we publish a new episodes. So whether that's on the podcast channel or our YouTube channel, watching the videos, it's all there. It's all daily and we want you to get the info when it comes out. So without further ado, and until tomorrow Patrick Rif